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Shrimping in BJJ: Everything you need to know

shrimping in bjj

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a martial art that focuses on ground fighting and submission holds. One of the key moves in BJJ is shrimping. This technique helps you create space and escape from tough positions. This guide will explain shrimping, its variations, and common mistakes to avoid. Whether you’re new or experienced, learning shrimping is crucial for improving your skills in BJJ.

What is Shrimping in BJJ?

Shrimping, also called the hip escape, is a basic move in BJJ. It involves moving your hips away from your opponent to create space. This move is important for escaping from bottom positions, like when your opponent is on top of you. By shrimping well, you can regain control or move to a better position.

History of BJJ Shrimping

Shrimping started in the early days of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. The Gracie family, who developed BJJ, created and improved this move. Over time, shrimping has become a key part of BJJ training for all levels.

Why Learn Shrimping?

Learning shrimping is important for several reasons. First, it helps you escape from tough positions, making you a better grappler. Second, shrimping improves your mobility and flexibility, which are important for many BJJ techniques. Lastly, mastering shrimping boosts your confidence on the mat, knowing you have a reliable escape move.

Variations in Shrimping

Backward or Reverse Shrimping

Backward shrimping involves moving your hips backward while pushing off with your feet. This is often used to escape from mount or side control.

Forward Shrimping

Forward shrimping involves moving your hips forward. This is useful for moving from guard to a more offensive position.

Sideways Shrimping

Sideways shrimping is a lateral move that helps you create space and reposition yourself. This is effective when your opponent is pressuring you from the side.

Shrimping Improves Mobility

Good shrimping greatly improves your range of motion and overall mobility. By practicing different hip movements, like the regular hip escape, double hip escape, and sitting hip escape, you can move better on the mat. This increased mobility helps with both escapes and offensive moves.

Defensive Shrimping

Defensive shrimping is mainly used to escape from tough positions. By creating space and repositioning yourself, you can stop your opponent’s attacks and regain control. This is especially useful when your opponent is in mount or side control.

Offensive Shrimping

Spider Guard Triangle

The spider guard triangle is an offensive move that uses shrimping to create space and set up a triangle choke. By shrimping well, you can position your legs to trap your opponent’s arm and neck, leading to a submission.

Closed Guard Triangle

Similar to the spider guard triangle, the closed guard triangle also relies on good shrimping. By creating space and moving your hips, you can set up a triangle choke from the closed guard position.

Half Guard Sweep

The half guard sweep is another offensive move that benefits from good shrimping. By creating space and shifting your hips, you can off-balance your opponent and execute a sweep, moving to a better position.

Most Common BJJ Shrimping Mistakes

Turns to the Same Side

One common mistake in shrimping is turning to the same side as your shrimping leg. This makes the move less effective and limits your ability to create space. Always move to the opposite side of your shrimping leg to make the move work better.

Staying Flat on the Ground

Another mistake is staying flat on the ground while shrimping. To move better, raise your hips and shift your weight to your knees and shoulders. This allows for a more effective escape and better positioning.

Small Movements

Small movements can use a lot of energy and be less effective. When shrimping, aim to make larger, more deliberate movements to create significant space and improve your positioning.

Conclusion

Mastering shrimping in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is key for both defensive and offensive moves. By understanding the variations, improving your mobility, and avoiding common mistakes, you can get better on the mat. Whether you’re new or experienced, adding shrimping to your training will make you a more effective grappler.

FAQs

How often should I practice shrimping in BJJ?

Practice shrimping regularly, ideally during every training session, to develop muscle memory and improve your technique.

Can shrimping help in other martial arts?

Yes, shrimping is a basic move that can be useful in other grappling-based martial arts, like judo and wrestling.

What are some drills to improve shrimping?

Drills like the hip escape drill, partner shrimping, and resistance band shrimping can help improve your technique and mobility.

Is shrimping effective for self-defense?

Yes, shrimping is a good technique for creating space and escaping from tough positions in self-defense situations.

Can I use shrimping in MMA?

Absolutely. Shrimping is a valuable move in MMA for escaping from ground positions and moving to better positions.

What should I focus on when shrimping?

Focus on creating space, keeping proper body alignment, and making deliberate, effective movements to make the move work better.

Sources

  • Cameron

    Cameron is the Founder of Grapplers Graveyard. He is an athlete, a life-long learner, and a combat sports enthusiast. His goal is to build websites that help people become smarter, healthier, and happier.

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